Key To Procambarus

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AUSTROCAMBARUS
CAPILLICAMBARUS
GIRARDIELLA
HAGENIDES
LECONTICAMBARUS
ORTMANNICUS
PARACAMBARUS
PENNIDES
SCAPULICAMBARUS
VILLALOBOSUS
 

 

 

KEY TO THE OF THE GENUS PROCAMBARUS

(Based on the First-Form Male)


1.       Carapace with 2 or more cervical spines (Fig. 20a):  .........................................................................   2

  • Carapace with or without 1 cervical spine (Fig. 20b): .........................................................................   4
Fig. 20.  Lateral view of carapaces showing presence (a) and absence (b) of cervical spines.

2(1) First pleopods asymmetrical (Like Fig. 21c,d): ...........................................  Pennides  Hobbs, 1972

  •  First pleopods symmetrical (Like Fig. 21a,b): .....................................................................................   3
Fig. 21.  Ventral view of first pleopods: a and b, symmetrical;  c and d, asymmetrical.  a, Procambarus hagenianus;  b, P. llamasi;  c, P. seminolae;  d, P. acutissimus.  (x, proximomedian lobe).

3(2).    Albinistic; eyes reduces and without pigment:  ................................  Remoticambarus  Hobbs, 1972

        [Monotyoic:  Procambarus (R.) pecki  Hobbs 1967.]
          (Subterranean waters of northern  Alabama.  See Fig. 22b.  Literature:  Hobbs, 1967)

  • Pigmented; eyes well developed:  ...............................................  Austrocambarus  Hobbs, 1972 (part)

 


4(1).   Cephalic surface of first pleopod with prominent angular or subangular shoulder situated far
            proximal to base of terminal elements (Figs. 22as, b, c,  30,  56):....................................................  5

  • Cephalic surface of first pleopod with or without prominent angular or subangular shoulder;
    if present, situated immediately proximal to base of terminal elements (Fig. 22d-h), or, if
    situated more proximally, somewhat rounded and cephalic process never broadly rounded
    (Figs.  48f, 49h, 54a,b):............................................................................................................................  7

 


5(4).   Hooks on ischia of third and fourth pereiopods (Fig 4c); first pleopod with subapical setae
           (Fig. 22a):............................................................................................  Scapulicambarus  Hobbs, 1972

  • Hooks on ischia of third pereiopods only (Fig. 4a); first pleopod without subapical setae
    (Fig. 22b,c):...............................................................................................................................................  6

 

Fig. 22.  Lateral view of left first pleopods.  a, Procambarus okaloosae;  b, P. pecki;  c, P. rodriguezi;  d, P. fitzpatricki;  e, P. digueti;  f, P. latipleurum;  g, P. s. simulans;  h, P. tenuis.  (s, shoulder).

6(5).   Mesial process of first pleopod massive, obscuring entire remainder of distal portion of
           appendage in caudal aspect (Fig. 23a; see also Figs. 11g, 22b):...  Remoticambarus Hobbs, 1972.

        MonotypicProcambarus (R.) pecki  Hobbs, 1967.
         (See couplet 3 for range and literature).

  • Mesial process of first pleopod spiniform or lanceolate, never obscuring entire remainder of
    distal portion of appendage in caudal aspect (Fig. 23b):..............................  Austrocambarus (part).

 


7(4).   Hooks on ischia of fourth pereiopods only (Fig. 4e),  occasionally with vestigial ones on
           third pereiopods:......................................................................................................................................  8

  • Hooks on ischia of third or third and fourth pereiopods well developed (Fig. 4a, c, d):...................  10
Fig. 23.  Caudal view of left first pleopods.  a, Procambarus pecki;  b, P. williamsoni.  (m, mesial process).

8(7).   Central projection of first pleopod beaklike and curved caudally (Fig. 24a,b):.................................
           ...............................................................................................................  Paracambarus  Ortmann, 1906.

  • Central projection of first pleopod never beaklike, variously directed (Figs. 24c, d, 57):.................   9
Fig. 24.  Lateral view of left first pleopods.  a, Procambarus paradoxus;  b, P. ortmanni;  c, P. riojai;  d, P. fitzpatricki.  (e, central projection).

9(8).   Mesial ramus of uropod with distomedian spine projecting beyound margin of ramus (Like
           Fig. 40b; see also Fig. 24d):....................................................................  Acucauda  Hobbs, 1972.

          MonotypicProcambarus (A.) fitzpatricki  Hobbs, 1971.
           (Burrows in southern Mississippi between the Wolf and Pascagoula rivers.  Literature: Hobbs, 1971a)

  • Mesial ramus of uropod with distomedian spine never projecting beyound margin of ramus
    (Like Fig. 40a):.................................................................................................  Villalobosus  Hobbs, 1972.

 


10(7).   Chela without tubercles or brush of setae on mesial surface of palm;  first 3 pairs of
             pereiopods with conspicuous brush of plumose setae extending from basis to at least
             proximal part of merus (Fig. 25a):........................................................  Capillicambarus  Hobbs, 1972.

  • Chela with tubercles (Fig. 26a, c-e) (sometimes obscured by conspicuous brush of setae,
    Fig. 26f) on mesialsurface of palm (tubercles almost obsolete in P. youngi); first 3 pairs of
    pereiopods always lacking conspicuous brush of plumose setae extending from basis to at
    least proximal part of merus (Fig. 25b):..................................................................................................   11
Fig.  25.  Ventral view of left third maxillipeds and first three pereiopods.  a, Procambarus hinei;  b, P. barbatus.

11(10).   Chela strongly depressed, usually broadly triangular, and with mesialmost row of tubercles
                on palm cristiform or subcristiform (Fig. 26a):..........................................  Hagenides  Hobbs, 1972

  • Chela subovate to cylindrical, mostly elongate, and lacking cristiform row of tubercles on
    mesial margin of palm (Figs. 26b-f, 38a-c):..........................................................................................  12

 


12(11).  Hooks on ischia of third pereiopods only (Fig. 4a):..........................................................................  13

  • Hooks on ischia of third and fourth pereiopods (Fig. 4c,d):.................................................................  16

 


13(12).  First pleopod with subapical setae (Fig. 22f):.............................  Leconticambarus  Hobbs, 1972.

  • First ploepod without subapical setae (Figs 22e, g, 27a):..................................................................  14
Fig. 26.  Dorsal view of chelae.  a, Procambarus rogersi expletus;  b, P. youngi;  c, P. lecontei;  d, P. hirsutus;  e, P. seminolae;  f,  P. barbatus.

14(13):  Cephalic process of first pleopod forming curved plate across cephalodistal extremity
               of appendage (Fig. 27a):....................................................................  Mexicambarus  Hobbs, 1972.

             MonotypicProcambarus (M.) bouvieri  (Ortmann, 1909).
              (Streams in the vicinity of Uruapan, Michoacán, México.  Literature: Villalobos, 1955).

  • Cephalic process of first pleopod variable in form but never consisting of curved plates
    across cephalodistal extremity of appendage (Fig. 22e, g):...............................................................  15

 


15(14).  Rostrum with median carina (Fig. 28ak); first pleopod with proximomedian lobe absent
              (Like Fig. 21b; see also Figs.6a, 22e):...............................................Procambarus  Ortmann, 1905.

             MonotypicProcambarus (P.) digueti   (Bouvier, 1897).
              (Streams in Jalisco and Michoacan, México.  Literature: Villalobos, 1955).

  • Rostrum without median carina (Like Fig. 28b); first pleopod with proximomedian lobe very
    strongly developed (Fig. 21ax):..........................................................................  Girardiella  Lyle, 1938.

 


16(12).  Bituberculate hooks on ischia of third and fourth pereiopods (Fig. 4d; see also Fig. 11d);
              albinistic:.................................................................................................  Lonnbergius  Hobbs, 1972.

             MonotypicProcambarus (L.) acherontis   (Lonnberg, 1895).
              (Subterranean waters and springs in Seminole County, Florida.  Literature:  Hobbs, 1942b).

  • Bituberculate hooks never on ischia of both third and fourth pereiopods; albinistic or
    pigmented:...............................................................................................................................................  17
Fig. 27.  Lateral view of left first pleopods.  a, Procambarus bouvieri;  b, P. tenuis;  c, P. lewisi;  d, P. a. acutus;  e, P. fallax;  f, P. pictus;  g, P. planirostris;  h, P. p. pearsei  (cp, cephalic process).

17(16).  First pleopod without subapical setae (Fig. 27b,c):.......................................................................  18

  • First pleopod with subapical setae (Figs. 27d-h, 29c-f):...................................................................  19
Fig. 28.  Dorsal view of carapaces.  a, Procambarus digueti;  b, P. rathbunae.  (k, median carina.).

18(17).  First pleopod with central projection very conspicuous and extending distally far beyond
               cephalic and mesial processes;  cephalic process situated distinctly mesial to base of
               central projection (Fig. 27b):...........................................................  Tenuicambarus  Hobbs, 1972

              MonotypicProcambarus (T.) tenuis  Hobbs, 1950.
               (Stream tributaries of the Red and Ouachita rivers in southeastern Oklahoma and
                western Arkansas.  Literature:  Williams, 1954a;  Hobbs, 1962).

  • First pleopod with central projection not conspicuously large and never extending distally far
    beyond cephalic and mesial processes; cephalic process, if present, either cephalic of
    lateral to central projection (Figs. 27c, 47c, 48f):...........................  Ortmannicus  Fowler, 1912 (part)
Fig. 29.  Lateral view of left first pleopods.  a, Procambarus latipleurum;  b, P. litosternum;  c, P. barbatus;  d, P. villalobosi;  e, P. kilbyi;  f, P. hubbelli;  (cp, cephalic process).

19(17).  Mesial process of first pleopod usually extending to or beyond apical plane perpendicular
               to axis
of shaft of appendage (Fig. 29a); if not (Fig. 29f), mesial surface of palm of chela
               bearded (Fig. 26f):.......................................................................................  Leconticambarus (part)

  • Mesial process of first pleopod seldom extending to or beyond apical plane perpendicula
    to axis
    of shaft of appendage (Fig. 29b);  if so, cephalic process situated caudomesial to
    central projection (Fig. 29d)  or subapical setae situated lateral to base of cephalic process
    (Fig. 27e, f);  mesial surface of palm of chela never bearded (Fig. 26b-e):.......................................
    .....................................................................................................................................  Ortmannicus (part).

 


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END OF PROCAMBARUS SUBGENERA

Last Updated:  10 September 2004