ORTMANNICUS

Up
AUSTROCAMBARUS
CAPILLICAMBARUS
GIRARDIELLA
HAGENIDES
LECONTICAMBARUS
ORTMANNICUS
PARACAMBARUS
PENNIDES
SCAPULICAMBARUS
VILLALOBOSUS
 

 

 

KEY TO THE SPECIES OF THE SUBGENUS ORTMANNICUS

1.    Albinistic .........................................................................................................................................................  2
  • Pigmented...................................................................................................................................................  4

2(1).   Eye with small black pigment spot (see also Fig. 45a):....................................................................
           ............................................................................  Procambarus (O.) lucifugus alachua  (Hobbs, 1940).

       (Subterranean habitats in western Gilchrist and southwestern Alachua counties , Florida.
         Intergrades with the nominate subspecies in Marion County, Florida.  Literature:
         Hobbs, 1942b, 1958c).

  • Eye without pigment........................................................................................................................................  3

3(2).   Distal portion of first pleopod bent caudally at 60 to 80 degrees, and cephalic process directed
          at angle of approximately 70 degrees, to main axis of appendage (Fig. 45b):................................
          ............................................................................  Procambarus (O.) lucifugus lucifugus  (Hobbs, 1940).

       (Subterranean habitats from Citrus and Hernando counties northward to Marion County, Florida,
         where it intergrades with P. lucifugus alachua.  Literature:  Hobbs, 1942b, 1958c).

  • Distal portion of first pleopod bent caudally at no more than 45 degrees, and cephalic process
    directed at angle of approximately 35 degrees, to main axis of appendage (Fig. 45c; see also Fig. 9b):.
    ...................................................................................................  Procambarus (O.) pallidus  (Hobbs, 1940).

       (Subterranean habitats from Suwannee County to northwestern Alachua County, Florida.
         Literature:  Hobbs, 1942b, 1962).

Fig. 45.  Lateral view of left first pleopods.  a, Procambarus lucifugus alachua;  b, P. l. lucifugus;  c, P. pallidus.

4(1).  Subapical setae borne on knob on cephalodistal or laterodistal surface of first pleopod
          (Figs. 46a-h, 47a):...........................................................................................................................................  5

  • Subapical setae, if present, never borne on distinct knob (Figs. 47b-h, 48, 49, 50):.............................  13

5(4).   Setiferous knob situated on cephalodistal surface of first pleopod with broad gap between it and
           cephalic process (Fig. 46a):.............................................  Procambarus (O.) viaeviridis  (Faxon, 1914).

       (Sluggish streams and lentic habitats from Clay and Greene counties, Arkansas, to
        Tuscaloosa County, Alabama.  Literature:  Faxon, 1914; Hobbs, 1962).

  • Setiferous knob of first pleopod usually laterally situated; if cephalic to cephalic process never
    widely separated from it (Figs. 46b-h, 47a):.................................................................................................  6
Fig. 46. Lateral view of left first pleopods.  a, Procambarus viaeviridis;  b, P. hayi;  c, P. lecontei;  d, P. acytissimus;  e, P. texanus;  f, P. acutus cuevachicae;  g, P. lophotus;  h, P. blandingii.  (ck, caudal knob;  cp, cephalic process;  e, central projection;  m, mesial process;  c, caudal process).

6(5).   Setiferous knob situated at lateral base of caudal process of first pleopod (Fig. 46b):...........................
           .............................................................................................................  Procambarus (O.) hayi  (Faxon, 1884).

       (Lentic and sluggish lotic habitats in the Tombigbee and Tallahatchie river systems in Mississippi
         and Alabama, and in the Hatchie drainage system in Tennessee.  Literature:  Faxon, 1885;
         Hobbs, 1962).

  • Caudal knob of first pleopod situated cephalically of laterally but never so far caudally as at
     base of caudal process (Figs. 46c-h, 47a):....................................................................................................  7

7(6).   Mesial process of first pleopod directed at 90 degree angle to main axis of appendage (Fig. 46c, d):..
           ..............................................................................................................................................................................  8

  • Mesial process of first pleopod directed at angle less than 90 degrees to main axis of appendage
    (Figs. 46e-h, 47a):..............................................................................................................................................  9

8(7).   Cephalic process and central projection of first pleopod directed caudally at 90 degree angle to
           main axis of appendage (Fig. 46c; see also Fig. 26c):........  Procambarus (O.) lecontei  (Hagen, 1870).

      (Streams in Stone County, Mississippi, and Mobile County, Alabama,  Literature:  Hobbs, 1952a).

  • Cephalic process and central projection of first pleopod directed caudodistally at angle much
    less than 90 degrees to main axis of appendage (Fig. 46d; see also Fig. 21d):.........................
    ...........................................................................................  Procambarus (O.) acutissimus (Girard, 1852).

       (Lentic habitats in the Tombigbee, Alabama, and Choctawhatchee drainages in east central
        Mississippi and west central Alabama.  Literature:  Hobbs, 1962).

Fig. 47.  Lateral view of left first pleopods.  a, Procambarus a. acutus;  b, P. bivittatus;  c, P. lewisi;  d, P. villalobosi;  e, P. gonopodocristatus;  f, P. mancus;  g, P. p. pearsei;  h, P. planirostris.  (c, caudal process;  ck, caudal knob;  cp, cephalic process;  e, central projection; m, mesial process).

9(7).   Prominent gap between caudal process and central projection of first pleopod (Fig. 46e):......................
           ........................................................................................................  Procambarus (O.) texanus  Hobbs, 1971.

       (Lentic and sluggish lotic habitats in Bastrop County, Texas.  Literature:  Hobbs, 1971b).

  • Gap between caudal process and central projection of first pleopod exceedingly narrow (Figs. 46f-h, 47a):.................................................................................................................................................................  10

10(9).  Cephalic process of first pleopod bladelike and rounded distally (Fig. 46f):........................................
             ............................................................................  Procambarus (O.) acutus cuevachicae  (Hobbs, 1941).

       (Subterranean and lentic habitats in San Luis Potosí and Puebla, México.  Literature:  Villalobos, 1959).

  • Cephalic process of first pleopod tapering and acute (Figs. 46g, h, 47a):................................................
    ............................................................................................................................................................................  11

11(10).  Caudal process of first pleopod lanceolate in lateral aspect (Fig. 46g):.............................................
              ................................................................................  Procambarus (O.) lophotus  Hobbs and Walton,1960.

       (Lentic and lotic habitats in tributaries of the Alabama River from Clarke County, Alabama to
        Gordon and Catoosa countries, Georgia, and in the Tennessee drainage in Polk County,
        Tennessee, and northwestern Georgia.  Literature:  Hobbs and Walton, 1960;  Hobbs, 1962).

  • Caudal process of first pleopod tapering from base in lateral aspect (Figs. 46h, 47a):..............................
    ..............................................................................................................................................................................  12

12(11).  First pleopod with setiferous knob situated at extreme cephalic base of cephalic process;
              setae not obscuring part of central projection in lateral aspect (Fig. 46h):.............................
              .................................................................................................  Procambarus (O.) blandingii  (Harlan, 1830).

       (Lentic and lotic habitats from the Pee Dee River system to the Santee system in southern
         North Carolina and in South Carolina.  Literature:  Faxon, 1885;  Hobbs, 1962).

  • First pleopod with setiferous knob situated cephalolateral to cephalic process; setae obscuring
    at least proximal 1/2 of central projection in lateral aspect (Fig. 47a):.............................................................
    .............................................................................................  Procambarus (O.) acutus acutus  (Girard, 1852).

       (Sluggish to moderately flowing streams and lentic habitats in the coastal plain and piedmont
         from Maine to Georgia, from Minnesota to Ohio, and from the Florida panhandle to Texas;
          intergrades with P. a. cuevachicae in Texas and northern México.  Literature:  Hobbs, 1962). 


13(4).   First pleopod with subapical setae absent (Figs. 47c, 48f):....................................................................  14

  • First pleopod with subapical setae present (Figs. 47b, d-h):.....................................................................  15

14(13).  Cephalic process of first pleopod directed distally (Fig. 47c; see also Fig. 51b):....................................
               ...................................................................................  Procambarus (O.) lewisi  Hobbs and Walton, 1959.

       (Sluggish lotic and lentic habitats between the Alabama and Chattahoochee rivers in
         southeastern Alabama.  Literature:  Hobbs and Walton, 1959;  Hobbs, 1962).

  • Cephalic process of first pleopod directed caudally (Fig. 48f):.......................................................................
    ............................................................................................  Procambarus (O.) hybus  Hobbs an Walton, 1957. 

       (Lentic habitats and burrows in the Tombigbee River drainage in Alabama and Mississippi.
         Literature:  Hobbs and Walton, 1957;  Hobbs, 1962).


15(13).   Caudal knob of first pleopod distinct and extending distally to approximately same level as
                caudal process and central projection (Fig. 47b; see also Fig. 51a):.................................................
               ....................................................................................................  Procambarus (O.) bivittatus  Hobbs, 1942.

       (Streams from the Pearl River drainage in Louisiana to the Escambia River drainage in
        Santa Rosa County, Florida.  Literature:  Hobbs, 1942b).

  • Caudal knob of first pleopod, if distinct, directed caudodistally, never extending to approximately
    same level as caudal process and central projection (Figs. 47d-h, 48a-e, g, h, 49, 50):..........................  16
Fig. 48.  Lateral view of left first pleopods.  a, Procambarus verrucosus;  b, P. evermanni;  c, P. caballeroi;  d, P. pearsei plumimanus;  e, P. jaculus;  f, P. hybus;  g, P. lepidodactylus;  h, P. toltecae.  (c, cephalic process;  e, central projection;  m, mesial process).

16(15).    Caudal process of first pleopod prominent, usually compressed laterally, and arising from
                 caudolateral surface of pleopod; caudal knob never well defined; cephalic process absent,
                 or if present, arising from cephalic or cephalomesial side of central projection
                 (Figs. 47d-h, 48a-e):.....................................................................................................................................  17

  • Caudal process of first pleopod seldom prominent, sometimes absent, if present, arising distinctly
    mesial to caudal knob except in P. lepidodactylus and P. toltecae in which cephalic process
    situated lateral to central projection; cephalic process arising from cephalic or lateral side of
    central projection (Figs. 48g, h, 49, 50):...........................................................................................................  26

17(16).   Cephalic process of first pleopod situated on mesial surface of appendage and directed
                distally (Fig. 47d):...........................................................  Procambarus (O.) villalobosi  Hobbs, 1969.

       (Stream in Cueva del Agua, 75 km east of Valles, San Luis Potosí, México.
         Literature:  Hobbs, 1969a).

  • Cephalic process of first pleopod absent, or situated cephalic or cephalomesial to central
    projection (Figs. 47e-h, 48a-e):....................................................................................................................  18

18(17).   Caudal process of first pleopod forming long bladelike arc along distal caudolateral surface of
                appendage (Fig. 47e):..............................  Procambarus (O.) gonopodocristatus  Villalobos, 1958.

       (Lentic habitats in northern Veracruz, Mexico.  Literature:  Villalobos, 1959).

  • Caudal process of first pleopod never forming long bladelike arc along distal caudolateral surface
    of appendage (Figs. 47f-h, 48a-e):...............................................................................................................  19

19(18).  Cephalic process of first pleopod absent (Fig. 47f):................................................................
               ...............................................................................  Procambarus (O.) mancus  Hobbs and Walton, 1957.

       (Lentic habitats and burrows in Lauderdale and Newton counties, Mississippi.
        Literature:  Hobbs and Walton, 1957;  Hobbs, 1962).

  • Cephalic process of first pleopod present (Figs. 47g, h, 48a-e):..............................................................  20

20(19).  Central projection of first pleopod directly caudally at 90 degree angle to main axis of appendage
               (Fig. 47g, h):..................................................................................................................................................  21

  •  Central projection of first pleopod never directed caudally so much as at 90 degree angle to main
    axis of appendage (Fig. 48a-e):......................................................................................................................  22

21(20).  All terminal elements of first pleopod directed caudad at 90 degree angle to main axis of
              appendage, and cephalic process extending as far caudad as caudal process (Fig. 47g):..
              ................................................................................  Procambarus (O.) pearsei pearsei  (Creaser, 1934).

       (Lentic habitats and burrows from Cumberland County, North Carolina, southward to Horry County,
        South Carolina.  Apparently intergrading with P. pearsei plumimanus in Johnston and Pitt counties,
        North Carolina.  Literature:  Creaser, 1934b; Hobbs, 1962).

  • Mesial process of first pleopod directed caudodistally and cephalic process never extending so
    far caudad as caudal process (Fig. 47h):.............................................................................................
    ....................................................................................................  Procambarus (O.) planirostris  Penn, 1953.

       ("Florida" parishes of southeastern Louisiana and Pearl River and Wnston counties, Mississippi.
          Literature:  Penn, 1953b;  Hobbs, 1962).


22(20).   Rostrum with marginal spines or tubercles, or at least angulate at base of acumen (Fig. 51c):.
               .......................................................................................................................................................................  23

  • Rostrum with acumen not distinctly delimited basally (Fig. 51d):................................................................  24

23(22).   Cephalodistal surface of first pleopod with long rounded hump extending proximally from base
                of cephalic process and with subapical setae restricted to area cephalic to base of cephalic
                process (Fig. 48a; see also Fig. 51c):........................  Procambarus (O.) verrucosus  Hobbs, 1952.

       (Stream tributaries of the Tallapoosa and Chattahoochee rivers in southeastern Alabama.
        Literature:  Hobbs, 1952a, 1962).

  • Cephalodistal surface of first pleopod not produced in long rounded hump;  subapical setae present
    also at lateral bases of cephalic process and central projection (Fig. 48b):...........................................
    ....................................................................................................  Procambarus (O.) evermanni (Faxon, 1890).

       (Sluggish streams and lentic habitats from Jackson County, Mississippi, to Santa Rosa
        County, Florida. Literature:  Hobbs, 1942b).


24(22).   Caudal process of first pleopod acute (Fig. 48c):....................................................................
               ....................................................................  Procambarus (O.) caballeroi  Villalobos, 1944.

       (Streams south of Villa Juarez, Puebla, Mexico.  Known only from area of the type locality.
         Literature:  Villalobos, 1959).

  • Caudal process of first pleopod rounded or truncate (Fig. 48d, e):.........................................................  25

25(24).  Mesial process of first pleopod gently tapering and directed caudally;  cephalic process situated
              cephalomesial to central projection; caudal process subtruncate (Fig. 48d):....................................
              ........................................................  Procambarus (O.) pearsei plumimanus  Hobbs and Walton 1958.

       (Lentic habitats and burrows in Carteret, Craven, and Duplin counties, North Carolina.
        Literature:  Hobbs and Walton, 1958; Hobbs, 1962).

  • Mesial process of first pleopod lanceolate and directed caudodistally; cephalic process situated
    cephalic to cenral projection; caudal process rounded apically (Fig. 48e; see also Fig. 51d):.......
    .....................................................................................  Procambarus (O.) jaculus  Hobbs and Walton, 1957.

       (Lentic habitats and burrows in Avoyelles Parish, Louisiana, and in Hinds, Rankin, and Scott
        counties, Mississippi.  Literature:  Hobbs and Walton, 1957; Hobbs, 1962).


26(16).   Cephalic process of first pleopod situated distinctly lateral to central projection (Fig. 48g, h):.........  27

  • Cephalic process of first pleopod situated cephalic to central projection (Figs. 49, 50):.......................  28

27(26).   Rostrum with marginal spines; first pleopod with subapical setae distributed from caudal base
               of cephalic process to cephalic margin of pleopod (Fig. 48g):........................................................
               ..........................................................................................  Procambarus (O.) lepidodactylus  Hobbs, 1947.

       (Streams in the Pee Dee and Santec drainage systems in eastern South Carolina and Columbus
         County, North Carolina.  Literature:  Hobs, 1947b, 1958c).

  • Rostrum without marginal spines; first pleopod with subapical setae situated in cluster caudoproximal
    to cephalic process (Fig. 48h):........................................................  Procambarus (O.) toltecae  Hobbs, 1943.

       (Lotic subterranean and epigean habitats in southern Tamaulips and southeastern San Luis Potosí,
        México.  Literature:  Villalobos, 1959).


28(26).  Caudal process of first pleopod absent or not evident in lateral aspect (Fig. 49a-g):...............................  29

  • Caudal process of first pleopod small to large, always evident in lateral aspect (Figs. 49h, 50):...
    .................................................................................................................................................................................  36
Fig. 49.   Lateral view of left first pleopods.  a, Procambarus youngi;  b, P. pycnogonopodus;  c, P. hirsutus;  d, P. angustatus;  e, P. seminolae;  f,  P. lunzi;  g,  P. ancylus;  h, P. fallax.

29(28).  First pleopod with subapical setae very few in number and restricted to cephalodistal margin
              at base of cephalic process (Fig. 49a); acumen as long as remainder of rostrum (see also Fig. 26b):
              .........................................................................................................  Procambarus (O.) youngi  Hobbs, 1942.

       (Streams in Leon, Gulf, and Wakulla counties, Florida.  Literature:  Hobbs, 1942).

  • First pleopod with subapical setae abundant and dispersed distally along cephalic and lateral surface
    of appendage (Fig. 49b-g); acumen, if distinct, much shorter than remainder of rostrum.........................  30

30(29).   Central projection of first pleopod minute, much less conspicuous than other terminal elements
                (Fig. 49b):..............................................................  Procambarus (O.) pycnogonopodus Hobbs, 1942.

       (Lentic and lotic habitats from the Choctawhatchee River eastward to the Apalachicola River in Florida.
        Literature:  Hobbs, 1942b).

  • Central projection of first pleopod always conspicuous, frequently as large as other terminal elements
    (Fig. 49c-g):.......................................................................................................................................................  31

31(30).   Areola never more than 4 times as long as broad....................................................................................  32

  • Areola always more than 4 times as long as broad......................................................................................  33
Fig. 50.   Lateral view of left first pleopods.  a, Procambarus leonensis;  b, P. litosternum;  c, P. pubescens;  d, P. epicyrtus;  e, P. enoplosternum;  f, P. pictus;  g, P. chacei.  (ck, caudal knob).

32(31).   Mesial process of first pleopod much longer than central projection (Fig. 49c; see also
               Fig. 26d):................................................................................  Procambarus (O.) hirsutus  Hobbs, 1958.

       (Streams in the Edisto, Salkehatchie, and Savannah drainage systems in South Carolina.
         Literature:  Hobbs, 1958a, 1958c).

  • Mesial process of first pleopod shorter than central projection (Fig. 49d):.................................
    ...........................................................................  Procambarus (O.) angustatus  (LeConte,1856).

       (Streams in "Georgia inferiore".  Known only from the single type-specimen.
         Literature:  LeConte, 1856;  Hobbs, 1962).


33(31).  Cephalic process of first pleopod directed distally or cephalodistally (Fig. 49e; see also
               Fig. 26e):.............................................................................  Procambarus (O.) seminolae  Hobbs, 1942.

       (Lentic and lotic habitats from the Altamaha River drainage, Georgia, to Marion County, Florida.
        Literature: Hobbs, 1942b, 1958c).

  • Cephalic process of first pleopod directed caudodistally (Figs. 49f, g, 50a):............................................  34

34(33).   Central projection of first pleopod toothlike, almost straight, and distinctly shorter than cephalic
                process (Fig. 50a):.............................................................  Procambarus (O.) leonensis  Hobbs, 1942.

       (Lentic and lotic habitats between the Apalachicola and Suwannee rivers, Florida.
        Literature:  Hobbs, 1942b).

  • Central projection of first pleopod somewhat bladelike, curved, and as long as cephalic process
    (Fig. 49f, g):........................................................................................................................................................  35
Fig. 51.   Dorsal view of carapaces.  a, Procambarus bivittatus;  b, P. lewisi;  c, P. verrucosus;  d,  P. jaculus.

35(34).   Laterodistal margin of first pleopod at base of central projection almost horizontal;  central
               projection directed caudally (Fig. 49f):.............................................  Procambarus (O.) lunzi  Hobbs, 1940.

       (Lentic and sluggish lotic habitats and burrows between the Combahee River, South Carolina,
        and Altamaha River, Georgia.  Literature:  Hobbs, 1940, 1958c).

  • Laterodistal margin of first pleopod at base of central projection steeply oblique;  central projection
    directed caudodistally (Fig. 49g):...................................................  Procambarus (O.) ancylus  Hobbs, 1958.

       (Lentic and lotic habitats and burrows from Columbus, Bladen, and Brunswick counties, North Carolina,
        southward to Richland and Colleton counties, South Carolina.  Literature:  Hobbs, 1958a, 1958c).


36(28).   Caudal knob (ck) of first pleopod well defined (Fig. 50b-g);  areola usually less than 5 times longer
                than broad......................................................................................................................................................  38

  • Caudal knob of first pleopod not well defined (Figs. 49h, 50a); areola usually more than 5 times longer
    than broad............................................................................................................................................................  37

37(36).   Mesial process of first pleopod lanceolate; caudal process situated lateral to central projection
                (Fig. 49h):.................................................................................  Procambarus (O.) fallax  (Hagen, 1870).

       (Lentic and lotic habitats from the Satilla River drainage, Georgia, southward through peninsular
        Florida.  Literature:  Hobbs, 1942b).

  • Mesial process of first pleopod subspiculiform;  caudal process situated caudal to central projection
    (Fig. 50a):...................................................................................  Procambarus (O.) leonensis Hobbs, 1942.

38(36).  Caudal knob of first pleopod with troughlike groove cephalically (Fig. 50b):...............................
               ...............................................................................................  Procambarus (O.) litosternum  Hobbs,1947.

       (Stream tributaries of the Canoochee, Ogeechee, and Newport rivers in southeastern Georgia.
        Literature:  Hobbs, 1947a, 1958c).

  • Caudal knob of first pleopod inflated or truncate but never with troughlike groove cephalically
    (Fig. 50c-g):..........................................................................................................................................................  39

39(38).   Caudal knob of first pleopod truncate and somewhat compressed (Fig. 50c):........................
                ............................................................................................  Procambarus (O.) pubescens  (Faxon, 1884).

       (Streams from the Oconee to the Savannah drainage systems in Georgia and South Carolina.
         Literature:  Hobbs, 1947a, 1962).

  • Caudal knob of first pleopod inflated (Fig. 50d-g):..........................................................................................  40

40(39).  Cephalic process of first pleopod much shorter than central projection (Fig. 50d, e):...........................  41

  •  Cephalic process of first pleopod as long as central projection (Fig. 50f, g):............................................  42

41(40).   Caudal process of first pleopod in lateral aspect projecting caudally between central projection
                and caudal knob, filling interval between them (Fig. 50d):..  Procambarus (O.) epicyrtus  Hobbs, 1958.

       (Stream tributaries of the Oconee and Ogeechee rivers in Georgia.
         Literature:  Hobbs, 1958b, 1958c).

  • Caudal process of first pleopod in lateral aspect projecting caudally from level of caudal knob
    (Fig. 50e):.....................................................................  Procambarus (O.) enoplosternum  Hobbs, 1947.

       (Streams from the lower Oconee and Ohoopee river drainages in Georgia.
         Literature:  Hobbs, 1947a, 1958c).


42(40).   Caudal process of first pleopod in lateral aspect projecting caudally between central projection
                and caudal knob, filling interval between them (Fig. 50f):........................................................................
                ....................................................................................................  Procambarus (O.) pictus  (Hobbs, 1940).

       (Streams in Clay County, Florida.  Literature:  Hobbs, 1942b, 1962).

  • Caudal process of first pleopod in lateral aspect projecting caudally from level of caudal knob
    (Fig. 50g):........................................................................................  Procambarus (O.) chacei  Hobbs, 1958.

       (Streams from the Wateree River system, South Carolina, to the Canoochee River, Georgia.
         Literature:  Hobbs, 1958b, 1958c).


Top of Page

END OF ORTMANNICUS

Last Updated:  10 September 2004