DEPRESSICAMBARUS

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AVITICAMBARUS
CAMBARUS
DEPRESSICAMBARUS
EREBICAMBARUS
HIATICAMBARUS
JUGICAMBARUS
LACUNICAMBARUS
PUNCTICAMBARUS
VETICAMBARUS
 

 

 

KEY TO THE SPECIES OF THE SUBGENUS DEPRESSICAMBARUS


 

1.   First pleopod with central projection bearing subapical notch (Figs. 92d-f, 97a-c, n):...................................  2

  • First pleopod with central projection lacking subapical notch (Figs. 97d, e, 98):........................................  6
Fig. 97.  Lateral view of left first pleopods.  a, Cambarus cymatilis;  b, C. halli;  c, C. obstipus;  d, C. jordani;   e, C. reduncus.  (n, subapical notch).

2(1).  Areola obliterated or linear (Fig. 99a;  see also Fig. 97a):...........  Cambarus (D.) cymatilis  Hobbs, 1970.

       (Burrows in the Conasauga River drainage in northern Georgia.
         Literature:  Hobbs, 1970b).

  • Areola with room for 2 or more punctations across narrowest part (Figs. 99b, c, 100):...........................  3
Fig. 98.  Lateral view of left first pleopods.  a, Cambarus striatus;  b, C. floridanus;  c, C. catagius.

3(2).   Rostrum with marginal spines or tubercles (Fig. 99b, c):............................................................................  4

  • Rostrum without marginal spines of tubercles (Fig. 100):...........................................................................  5

4(3).   Areola less than 5 times longer than broad, constituting less than 35 per cent of total length of
           carapace, and studded with crowded punctations (Fig. 99b; see also Fig. 97b):..................................
           .......................................................................................................................  Cambarus (D.) halli  Hobbs, 1968.

       (Lotic habitats in the Tallapoosa River system in Alabama and Georgia.
        Literature:  Hobbs, 1968a, 1969b).

  • Areola more than 5 times longer than broad, constituting more than 35 per cent of total length of
    carapace, and with scattered punctations  (Fig. 99c;  see also Fig. 97c):..............................................
    ........................................................................................................................  Cambarus (D.) obstipus  Hall, 1959.

       (Lotic habitats in the Black Warrior River system in Alabama.  Literature:  Hall, 1959;  Hobbs, 1969b).

Fig. 99.  Dorsal view of carapaces.  a, Cambarus cymatilis;  b, C. halli;  c, C. obstipus;  d, C. jordani.

5(3).   Dorsal surface of palm of chela with many squamous tubercles (Fig. 101a);  areola usually at least
           5 times longer than broad and with 2 or 3 punctations across narrowest part (Fig. 100d;  see
           also Fig. 92e):.....................................................................................  Cambarus (D.) sphenoides  Hobbs, 1968.

       (Lotic habitats in the upper Cumberland and Tennessee dranage systems in western Kentucky,
        Alabama, and Tennessee.  Literature:  Hobbs, 1968a, 1969b).

  • Dorsal surface of palm of chela with very few tubercles lateral to 2 mesial rows (Fig. 101b);  areola
    always less than 5 times longer than broad and with 3 or more punctations across narrowest part
    (Fig. 100a;  see also Fig. 92f):..............................................  Cambarus (D.) unestami  Hobbs and Hall, 1969. 

       (Tributaries of the Tennessee River in Dade County, Georgia.
         Literature:  Hobbs and Hall, 1969;  Hobbs, 1969b).


6(1).   Acumen of rostrum delimited basally by marginal spines or tubercles, occasionally reduced to
           minute tubercle or distinct angle (Fig. 99c, d):..............................................................................................  7

  • Acumen of rostrum not delimited basally by marginal spines or tubercles, rounded at base of
    acumen (Fig. 100b, c):.....................................................................................................................................  8

7(6).   Areola constituting less than 35 per cent of entire length of carapace and less than 8 times longer
            than broad (Fig. 99d;  see also Fig. 97d):............................................  Cambarus (D.) jordani  Faxon, 1884.

       (Lotic habitats in the Coosa River system in Alabama and Georgia.
        Literature:  Faxon, 1884).

  • Areola constituting more than 35 per cent of entire length of carapace and more than 8 times
    longer than broad (Fig. 99c;  see also Fig. 97c):...................................  Cambarus (D.) obstipus  Hall, 1959.

       (See couplet 4 for range and literature).

Fig. 100.  Dorsal view of carapaces.  a, Cambarus unestami;  b, C. latimanus;  c, C. striatus;  d, C. sphenoides.

8(6).   Areola less than 12 times longer than broad (Fig. 100b; see also Figs. 89o, 90e, 92b):..................
           .............................................................................................................  Cambarus (D.) latimanus  (LeConte, 1856).

       (Lotic habitats from the Pamilico River system in North Carolina to the Alabama River system in
        Alabama, chiefly in the piedmont, but extending into western Florida along the Apalachicola River;
        also in southwestern Tennessee.  Literature:  Hobbs, 1942b, 1969b).

  • Areola more than 12 times longer than broad (Fig. 100c):........................................................................  9 

9(8).   First pleopod with subsetiform central projection, its apex directed proximally (Fig. 97e):.................
           ..................................................................................................................  Camabrus (D.) reduncus  Hobbs, 1956.

       (Lentic and lotic habitats and burrows in the piedmont from the Neuse River system in North Carolina
         to the Santee River system in South Carolina.  Literature:  Hobbs, 1956b, 1969b).

  • First pleopod with bladelike central projection, its apex directed caudoproximally (Fig. 98a-c):..........  10

10(9).   Central projection of first pleopod extending as far or farther caudad than mesial process
              (Fig.  98a;  see also Fig. 100c):.............................................................  Cambarus (D.) striatus  Hay, 1902.

       (Lentic and lotic habitats and burrows from from the Cumberalnd River system in Kentucky and
        Tennessee southward to Mississippi and Alabama.  The range cited includes a species complex
         including at least 2, and probably 3, species or subspecies.  Literature:  Rhoades, 1944a;
         Hobbs, 1969b).

  • Central projection of first pleopod not extending so far caudad as mesial process (Fig. 98b, c):.......  11
Fig. 101.  Dorsal view of chelae.  a, Cambarus sphenoides;  b, C. unestami.

11(10).   Color red; central projection of first pleopod longer than cephalocaudal plane of shat at base
                of projection;  gap between apex of mesial process and that of central projection less than
                height of projection at midlength (Fig. 98b):................................  Cambarus (D.) floridanus  Hobbs, 1941.

       (Burrows from the Yellow to the Ochlockonee river drainages in southern Alabama and Georgia,
        and Florida.  Literature:  Hobbs, 1942b;  Hobbs and Hart, 1959).

  • Color brown; central projection of first pleopod subequal to or shorter than cephalocaudal plane
    of shaft at base of projection;  gap between apex of mesial process and that of central projection
    distinctly greater than height of projection at midlength (Fig. 98c):............................................................
    ................................................................................................  Cambarus (D.) catagius  Hobbs and Perkins, 1967.

       (Burrows in Guilford County, North Carolina.  Literature:  Hobbs and Perkins, 1967;  Hobbs, 1969b).


END OF SUBGENUS DEPRESSICAMBARUS

 

Last Updated:  10 September 2004